Author: Rachel Welch

Life of a Caterpillar, Hope of a Butterfly

This Easter, my children received 5 caterpillars and all the necessary bits and bobs needed to nurture them into butterflies. On arrival, the caterpillars were fairly lifeless looking little pellets, (as I would be if I’d just travelled by post in a dark box), and I was slightly worried they were dead. Not so. We watched them eat and grow at an alarming rate, no longer little pellets but huge hairy caterpillars and I wondered if they had any idea that butterflyhood was around the corner? Living in their warm little container, shuffling round together and eating the whole day...

Read More

Finding The Great In The Ordinary

We’re at the midway point of the Easter holidays, and like any parent I’ve been busy conjuring up ways to enjoy spending these days with my children. We’ve been on a bus, a train, walked, cycled and had many trips out in the car. We’ve been to two seaside towns (we live in Norfolk, so that’s pretty easy for us) been swimming, eaten doughnuts, watched movies, had ice-cream, played in the garden, and the children have also been taken to the circus by their grandparents. All in a week. Yet a few days ago my 4-year-old daughter Pearl threw...

Read More

Spring: an opportunity for a fresh start

As someone who spends a lot of time at home, I notice the hidden bits of mess I might otherwise miss if I was out all day. The sticky fingerprints of my children that only show up when the sun is shining on the worktop at a certain angle, the crumbs under the table I’ve just realized are much more in number than I thought, and the various mismatched toys, shoes and clothes that somehow – constantly – end up in the wrong place. With spring (FINALLY) in the air, my motivation to tidy up is suddenly stepping up...

Read More

Anorexia, not Narcissism

The Joan Bakewell row that erupted over the weekend has hurt my head. Put simply, the Labour peer and broadcaster made speculative comments suggesting the rise in anorexia (particularly among young people) is a sign of narcissism and preoccupation with beauty and thinness. She went on to say that cultures in which food is scarce (her example being a Syrian refugee camp) ‘do not have anorexia’, thus apparently reinforcing her point. Oh, Joan. Unsurprisingly, her comments meant she wasn’t in for the best weekend ever, and felt the full force of the eating disorder community wanting their pound of...

Read More

Spring Comes After Winter

I don’t know what it’s like where you are, but I’m staring out at another damp, cold, grey day and feeling thankful I don’t have to particularly go anywhere today. And they call this spring? It’s been a funny winter. Sort of cold, mostly not, sort of dry but mostly damp, wintery but actually not that bad… and every day has been one big wardrobe headache that I’ve mostly got wrong with either a coat too thick/thin or having to carry hats and gloves around because it turned out not cold enough to put them on. Winter: if you...

Read More